Tang Horse Sculpture.

Tang Horse Sculpture

Frank Lloyd Wright was an avid collector of Asian art and he incorporated fine examples of it in his home, Taliesin, in Spring Green, Wisconsin, as well as at Taliesin West in Scottsdale, Arizona. Wright wrote of the deep significance these works of art meant to him: "As work and sojourn overseas continued, Chinese pottery and sculpture and Momoyama screens overflowed into the rooms where, in a few years, every single object used for decorative accent became an 'antique' of rare quality. If the eye rested on some ornament it could be sure of worthy entertainment. Hovering over these messengers to Taliesin from other civilizations and thousands of years ago, must have been the spirits of peace and good-will? Their figures seemed to shed a fraternal sense of kinship from their places in the stone or from the broad ledges where they rested."

Throughout China's long and storied past, no animal has affected its history as greatly as the horse. Ever since its domestication in northeastern China around 5,000 years ago, the horse has been in integral figure in the creation and survival of China. During the Tang Dynasty (618-907 A.D.) the horse was a symbol of status and power. To the Tang, riding was reserved for nobility and scholars.

Approx Dimensions: L: 15.5" x W: 5.75" x H: 13"  Weight: 19 lbs  

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